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Vendredi 21 janvier 2011 Numéro 670
Aujourd'hui en veille
Répondant à la FAE, l'AQRIPH réaffime que la classe ordinaire doit être la norme
La FAE juge que les options offertes aux EHDAA masquent le problème du décrochage scolaire
Des enseignants manifestent pour dénoncer le manque de ressources pour les EHDAA
Controverse entourant l'obtention d'un doctorat à l'University of Manitoba (art. anglais)
Guide sur les mesures d'urgence pour les personnes ayant des incapacités en Ontario (art. anglais)


Controverse entourant l'obtention d'un doctorat à l'University of Manitoba (art. anglais)
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Paru le jeudi 20 janvier 2011 sur CBC.CA/Winnipeg

Source
www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/19/man-lucacs-exam-anxiety-court.html

University moves to quash 'exam anxiety' lawsuit

Last Updated: Thursday, January 20, 2011 | 7:23 AM CST Comments41Recommend21.
CBC News

The University of Manitoba has repeatedly defended its decision to grant the PhD candidate his degree. (CBC)

A University of Manitoba math professor who is suing his employer over the granting of a PhD to a student with extreme exam anxiety faces a test of his dissent in a Winnipeg courtroom Thursday morning.

Gabor Lukacs and lawyers for the post-secondary school will square off at a morning hearing in the Court of Queen's Bench.

Lukacs is hoping the court will overturn a decision by the school's dean of graduate studies to waive a failed comprehensive exam for a PhD candidate, who said after the fact he suffered from acute exam anxiety.

Lawyers for the university are expected to argue Thursday that Lukacs has no standing to seek a judicial review of the school's decisions and that his lawsuit should be tossed out of court.

The university has previously said it was accommodating the legitimate disability of an otherwise exceptional student, but Lukacs argues it reflects poorly on the school's reputation.

In court documents filed in advance of Thursday's hearing, Lukacs calls the unnamed student's stated disability "controversial," and said it wasn't disclosed until after he failed the exam twice and was forced under university rules to withdraw from the program.

Lukacs wasn't the only faculty member to object to the school's decision, but he was the one who went to court to fight it.

The university suspended Lukacs for three months — even cancelled his email account — for going public with a student's health information.

He only recently returned to work.

International support
Lukacs's fight has drawn support from around the world.

An international group of 86 mathematicians sent a letter to U of M president David Barnard expressing their concern at the way the degree was granted and the way Lukacs was treated.

The university has responded with a letter to staff justifying the decision. The school says the unnamed student aced two other comprehensive exams and the exception was made because he was a scholar with an above-normal number of publications in refereed journals and was lauded by the internal and external examiners on his thesis committee.

The university's graduate students' association also objects to Lukacs's interference, although other students and faculty members signed a petition supporting him.

Thursday's hearing begins at 10 a.m. CT.


Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/19/man-lucacs-exam-anxiety-court.html#ixzz1Bgmt3V7J


Paru vendredi 21 janvier 2011 sur www.cbc.ca/Manitoba

Source
www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/19/man-lucacs-exam-anxiety-court.html

University moves to quash 'exam anxiety' lawsuit

Last Updated: Thursday, January 20, 2011 | 7:23 AM CST Comments41Recommend21.
CBC News

The University of Manitoba has repeatedly defended its decision to grant the PhD candidate his degree. (CBC)

A University of Manitoba math professor who is suing his employer over the granting of a PhD to a student with extreme exam anxiety faces a test of his dissent in a Winnipeg courtroom Thursday morning.

Gabor Lukacs and lawyers for the post-secondary school will square off at a morning hearing in the Court of Queen's Bench.

Lukacs is hoping the court will overturn a decision by the school's dean of graduate studies to waive a failed comprehensive exam for a PhD candidate, who said after the fact he suffered from acute exam anxiety.

Lawyers for the university are expected to argue Thursday that Lukacs has no standing to seek a judicial review of the school's decisions and that his lawsuit should be tossed out of court.

The university has previously said it was accommodating the legitimate disability of an otherwise exceptional student, but Lukacs argues it reflects poorly on the school's reputation.

In court documents filed in advance of Thursday's hearing, Lukacs calls the unnamed student's stated disability "controversial," and said it wasn't disclosed until after he failed the exam twice and was forced under university rules to withdraw from the program.

Lukacs wasn't the only faculty member to object to the school's decision, but he was the one who went to court to fight it.

The university suspended Lukacs for three months — even cancelled his email account — for going public with a student's health information.

He only recently returned to work.

International support
Lukacs's fight has drawn support from around the world.

An international group of 86 mathematicians sent a letter to U of M president David Barnard expressing their concern at the way the degree was granted and the way Lukacs was treated.

The university has responded with a letter to staff justifying the decision. The school says the unnamed student aced two other comprehensive exams and the exception was made because he was a scholar with an above-normal number of publications in refereed journals and was lauded by the internal and external examiners on his thesis committee.

The university's graduate students' association also objects to Lukacs's interference, although other students and faculty members signed a petition supporting him.

Thursday's hearing begins at 10 a.m. CT.


Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/19/man-lucacs-exam-anxiety-court.html#ixzz1Bgmt3V7J

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/21/mb-exam-anxiety-degree-challenge-lukacs-winnipeg.html


Judge reserves exam anxiety decision
Math prof wants PhD taken away from student
Last Updated: Friday, January 21, 2011 | 7:54 AM CST Comments71Recommend36.
The Canadian Press
Gabor Lukacs believes the University of Manitoba should have offered a modified exam to a student who claimed to be suffering from exam anxiety, rather than award the PhD after the student failed a key exam. (University of Manitoba)
A judge in Winnipeg has reserved decision in the case of a math professor who is challenging the granting of a PhD to a student who suffers from exam anxiety.

The case pits the University of Manitoba against Gabor Lukacs, who is upset that the university granted the PhD to a student who failed a key exam twice, and later claimed to suffer from exam anxiety.

Lukacs is asking the Court of Queen's Bench to revoke the degree.

Lukacs's lawyer warned in court on Thursday that the university is risking its academic reputation and could be seen as a diploma mill.

The university, however, is asking the court to dismiss Lukacs's complaint.

The school's lawyer, Jamie Kagan, said Lukacs is a "busybody" with no legal right to challenge the degree, because he wasn't the student's professor.

The student has an otherwise brilliant academic record, and Kagan insisted that exam anxiety is a recognized disability.

University defends waiving exam
The U of M said it accommodated the student by waiving the exam and acknowledging the student's other merits.

But Lukacs said that's not accommodation.

"Accommodation means if you have vision problems, you get a reader. If you have problems writing, you get a script," he said.

A modified exam should have been offered, Lukacs suggested.

"Your exam can be divided into two or three parts, smaller bits, all that is perfectly fine. But you still need, in some ways, to prove that you know what everybody in a particular program is supposed to know."

Justice Deborah McCawley on Thursday gave no indication as to when she might render her decision.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/21/mb-exam-anxiety-degree-challenge-lukacs-winnipeg.html#ixzz1Bgrnrapq
 


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